Hair loss in dogs: why does it happen?

Dr. Romero – Hair Loss In Dogs #Report

I think that one of the great concerns that every human being who lives with a dog has is: “My dog ​​loses hair.” So they give him vitamins, they give him minerals, they change his shampoo. “But my dog ​​loses hair all year long”, people say. And the big answer to all this is very simple. Our dogs live indoors most of the time. Our dogs are modified wolves and maintain what is called seasonal moult.

What is seasonal molting? Well, imagine that in winter you have an overcoat and a t-shirt underneath. Summer arrives and you take off the overcoat, you keep the shirt.

In reality, the dog loses his shirt, he loses the hair inside, the undercoat that is a fluff. But if he’s always inside, his body gets an order that says “Watch, calm down, it’s summer, it’s 25 degrees”and in addition the light influences a lot, “and you are inside with permanent light”.

The dog’s constant hair loss has nothing to do with any disease

When you are in your house you are in light all day, the light from outside and the light from inside, and you are at a constant temperature all day.

Does this mean that you subject the dog to the cold? No, this means that you understand that sometimesthe dog’s constant hair loss, has nothing to do with any disease.

It has to do with the seasonal moult It occurs twice a year in dogs and once a year in wolves. We alter this seasonal moult in living under a roof and with permanent lighting for our dogs.

During the moult of hair in the dogs we can observe the fall of it in large quantities, since the purpose is none other than to prepare the mantle for the change in temperatures.

The two layers of hair

The vast majority of dogs have two types of hair: one long and firm, exterior, which we call true hair, and another short and lax, interior, very fine and tenuous, which we call lanugo, fleece, jarre or plush.

The seasonal molt that occurs twice a year in dogs and once a year in wolves.  We alter this seasonal change in the indoor coexistence and with permanent lighting of our dogs (Getty Images)
The seasonal molt that occurs twice a year in dogs and once a year in wolves. We alter this seasonal change in the indoor coexistence and with permanent lighting of our dogs (Getty Images)

The first layer of hair, falls straight to gable or at least tends to, being excellent protection and insulation against inclement weather, especially the rain. This layer is then a moisture insulator. Her hair is practically permanent, it is not subjected to seasonal changes, that is, it does not fall out but undergoes a constant, gradual and imperceptible replacement.

The second layer of hair, generates excellent thermal insulation, and is subject to what we call seasonal moulting, the dog loses it before the summer because during it he does not need it. Not all breeds have this coat, which is why it is said that some of them do not lose their hair.

Either that the dog has an insulated raincoat on top and a warm sweater underneath that he pulls on or off as needed. Faced with this panorama, it is clear that the dog loses its hair (and perhaps not its tricks) in some seasons of the year, especially in those places with marked seasonal differences.

*Prof. Dr. Juan Enrique Romero @drromerook is a veterinarian. Specialist in University Education. Master in Psychoimmunoneuroendocrinology. Former Director of the School Hospital for Small Animals (UNLPam). University Professor in several Argentine universities. International speaker.

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